Title IX empowers women to take the helm on and off the water

Newsy, Linda Lindquist interview re: Title IX 50th Anniversary

On June 23, 1972 the global movement that has empowered girls and women to compete and excel in sport at all levels was launched with the passage of Title IX. 

I recently had the opportunity to speak about women in sailing as part of Newsy’s week-long tribute to the landmark 50th anniversary of this groundbreaking legislation.

In 1994, I worked with Doug McCormick, then CEO and President of Lifetime Television on sponsorship development for our  America3 Women’s Team. Doug produced Rocking the Boat— Women Race for the America’s Cup and with that the first network sports division devoted solely to women’s sports was born. It was on this project that I also met Brian Donlon, now Executive Producer at Newsy. We recently reconnected after his sterling tribute to Doug, who passed away in May.

While the path to equity in sport is far from over, we have come a long way – thanks to titans of change who stood up to say ‘all girls can play’, ‘women can win’ and ‘I am going to fight for equality.’  Sports legends including Billy Jean King, Donna DeVarona, Lyn St. James, Benita Fitzgerald Mosley, Dawn Riley, Julie Foudy and Rusty Kanokogi blazed trails for women both on and off of the playing field. As we stand on their shoulders, we must support those yet to embark on their path. 

let’s connect

Linda Lindquist

Linda Lindquist
513 Broadway | Newport, RI 02840
+1 312-560-1168 | Skype: lindalindquist-bishop
Linda@CGThink.com | Twitter: @L2Bthink or @CGThink

Navigating Change

Would I do this for another?

Tracy and Lanny Barnes, 2014 Olympics, Sochi

The story of the Barnes twin sisters has been ricocheting around the world. WHY?

It’s a story of:   • Sisterly bond    • Selfless love    • Standing for someone else’s greatness
and as Guinness claims, ‘The choices we make reveal the true nature of our character.’

BUT even of more importance, this is a shatteringly compelling story because it challenges us to ask ourselves the profoundly difficult question – Would I do this for another?  Watch Guinness video 1:04.

Tracy & Lanny

While we most likely will never have to wrestle with giving up our earned Olympic berth or even a coveted job to someone whom we are deeply connected – this question can provide us a great gift into our own self awareness. It forces the follow on questions of:
• What is most important to me?
• What opportunity might I create for another?
• What opportunity should and must I fully own as it is uniquely mine to celebrate in the world?

This is NOT the story of whether Tracy did the right or wrong thing by giving her sister Lanny the spot Tracy had earned on the U.S. Olympic biathlon team. This IS a story about someone who did something very good out of self-less love for another.

Old, and don’t miss Lanny and Tracy in Sochi.

What made Martin Luther King an extraordinary leader?

Harry Belafonte and Martin Luther King

Harry Belafonte and Martin Luther King
Harry Belafonte and Martin Luther King

On the 85th anniversary of Martin Luther King’s birthday, Fast Company looks behind the legend to the man, to highlight four attributes that profoundly contributed to his effectiveness as a transformative leader. MLK was extremely intentional about everything he did and said. In order to be effective in our intentionality – we must commit ourselves to constant self examination so that we can choose the best path as a leader.

1) Emotional Agility
Being aware enough of your emotions, and then choosing a response rather than reacting. What level of emotional agility do you possess – especially with the emotions of anger, confusion or fear? We will write on this more here at Courageous Thinking

2) Systems Thinking
We often focus too much on winning the battle, and lose sight of the war. No one thing creates sustainable change. It must occur within a system. What is the change we want to make? What is the larger system we need to effect, and work in, in order to make that change?

3) Occupy DC
To change a system, it takes a combination of critical mass and changing policy. MLK knew that DC was the platform he needed in order to cast his ‘Dream’. What platform do you need in order to create the change you are committed to?

4) Humor
It is scientifically proven that laughter creates positive physiological effects in addition to relational healing and fostering increased creative thinking. Where can you add appropriate humor to a situation?

Leadership does not require us to rise above our humanity, but to be aware of who we are, and to CHOOSE the best path to create healing and wholeness. Whether our change objective is within the spheres of civic, corporate, mission or social success – we must be intimately aware of who we are, and choose our response and strategy.